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Sunday, September 18, 2016

Fall burning program to start in early October on the Boise National Forest

BOISE, IdahoFire officials on the Boise National Forest will soon begin their annual fall prescribed burning program of nearly 3,100 acres this year, which could last for several weeks depending on weather and fuel conditions.  

Fire crews anticipate favorable weather conditions by early October, as temperatures continue to drop allowing them to ignite low-intensity prescribed fires that reduce potential wildfire fuel, improve wildlife habitat and reduce threats to nearby communities. 

Specific information is available by contacting the local ranger districts, the Boise National Forest Headquarters at 208-373-4100, online at www.rxfire.com or by calling the prescribed fire hotline at 208-373-4208.  

Fire officials strongly advise hunters and other outdoor enthusiasts to determine the location and anticipated times of burns before heading out into the forest.  

Fire personnel will attempt to contact people who might be hunting or recreating in an area before a planned ignition.  Impacts to recreational users on the forest are anticipated to be very minimal. 

Lowman Ranger District (530 acres): 

• Bear Creek (500 acres) about 20 air miles east of Lowman and near Grandjean will be ignited using a helicopter to reduce fuels and restore the area;
• District Pile Burning (10 Acres) will involve fire crews burning slash piles in a variety of locations across the district. This type of burning usually occurs after heavy precipitation or with snow on the ground;  
• Cache Creek Whitebark Pine (20 acres) will burn a series of hand piles created from thinning vegetation from around Whitebark Pine trees. The project is located approximately 15 air miles northeast of Lowman. 

Cascade Ranger District (440 acres): 

• Crawford Aspen (7 acres) is located about four miles northeast from Cascade and the goal is to improve aspen habitat and reduce wildfire risk to the urban area;
• Horsethief (360 acres) located about three miles northeast of Horsethief Reservoir will involve a helicopter and hand lighting to reduce fuel by igniting a landscape burn;  
• West Side Restoration Broadcast Burn (50 acres) is located about 10 miles west of Cascade, and fire crews will treat timber landing slash piles;
• District Pile Burns (23 acres) will involve fire crews burning slash piles in a variety of locations across the district. This type of burning usually occurs after heavy precipitation or with snow on the ground. Locations will include 15 miles west of Cascade and areas surrounding the FAA shed 10 miles southwest of Cascade. Other areas include single slash piles at Warm Lake, Crawford, Landmark and Yellowpine.

Emmett Ranger District (869 acres):

• West Scriver Pile Burn (364 acres) is located about seven miles north of Crouch and fire crews will burn slash piles near Forest Road 695 that are remaining from the West Scriver logging operations. This type of burning usually occurs after heavy precipitation or with snow on the ground;
• Pinney Slope Pile Burn (500 acres) is located about seven miles north of Crouch and fire crews will burn slash piles that are remaining from the Pinney Slope logging operations. This type of burning usually occurs after heavy precipitation or with snow on the ground;  
• District Pile Burning: (5 acres) will involve fire crews burning slash piles near Garden Valley. This type of burning usually occurs after heavy precipitation or with snow on the ground.  

Mountain Home Ranger District (1267 acres):

• Cottonwood II (1,000 acres) This broadcast burn is located 22 miles northeast of Boise and will involve a helicopter and hand lighting to maintain current desired vegetative conditions and fuel loadings by igniting a landscape burn;
• Boise Ridge Pile Burn (225 acres) located in the Shafer Butte area will involve slash pile burning;
• Trinity Salvage (42 acres) located west of Featherville will involve slash pile burning.  

Signs will be posted on roads near all burn areas prior to and when burning is in progress.

Site-specific burn plans have been developed to address potential smoke management concerns. All burns will be conducted when there is favorable atmospheric ventilation to minimize smoke impacts to local communities. Local residents may notice smoke from these prescribed burn projects for a few days following ignition, particularly in the evening hours.