Social Media Picasa Youtube

Idaho Fire Incident Map

Idaho Interagency Fire Restrictions Map

Friday, March 15, 2019

Job Opportunity with Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association


Deputy Fire Warden
Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association
McCall, Idaho
Salary Range:                     $24.00 - $28.00 per hour
Open Period:                      Thursday, March 14, 2019 to Wednesday, May 1, 2019
Position Information:         Exempt, Full-time Regular Employee with Benefits
Duty Location:                   McCall, Idaho

Job Summary
The Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association, Inc. (SITPA) is seeking a dynamic and energetic individual, with excellent leadership skill to join our management team.  Established in 1904, SITPA is a private, non-profit corporation, formed by private forest landowners for the purpose of furnishing, operating and maintaining, a protective system for the detection, prevention and suppression of forest and range fires in west-central Idaho.  SITPA, reviewed and approved by the state of Idaho, annually manages wildfires on over 500,000 acres of private, state, and federal lands within the state’s designated Southern Idaho Forest Protective District.
The Deputy Fire Warden serves as a deputy to the Chief Fire Warden in the planning, development, implementation and evaluation of an integrated fire management program.  The Deputy Fire Warden supervises timber protective association employees and oversees wildfire management and hazardous fuel treatment programs on private, state, and federal lands located within the association’s designated state hazard management area. 

Duties
The Deputy Fire Warden serves as a full deputy to the Chief Fire Warden.  This position manages the development and implementation of a comprehensive SITPA safety program, including risk assessments, job hazard assessments, and project safety planning including the procurement, training, appropriate use and maintenance of personal protective equipment.
  • Hires, trains, equips, and directs a qualified workforce to meet SITPA fire and hazard management program needs.  Selects subordinate supervisors and other SITPA employees.
  • Supervises directly, or provides technical and administrative support for the supervision of all Zone personnel
  • Plans and directs the overall work to be accomplished by subordinate supervisors, sets and adjusts priorities, and prepares schedules for the completion of work
  • Assigns work to subordinate supervisors based on priorities, selective consideration of the difficulty and requirements of assignments, and the capabilities of employees.
  • Develops performance standards and evaluates work performance of subordinates.  Advises, counsels, or instructs employees on both work and administrative matters.
  • Implements preparedness actions and establishes standard operating procedures used in the management of wildland fires to assure development of an adequate Zone initial attack resource.
  • Assures personnel and equipment are adequately planned for, budgeted, hired, trained, equipped, and managed to ensure seasonal fire readiness within the Zone.
  • Coordinates initial and extended attack operations for wildland fires detected within the fire protection district.  Routinely acts as the SITPA Fire Duty Officer.
  • Coordinates initial and extended attack operations with cooperating agencies on multi-jurisdictional wildland fires.  Ensures that actions taken address risk to human safety, the potential for damage to improvements, and resource values.
  • Prepares and implements fire hazard management plans and prescriptions to achieve fire and resource management objectives.
  • Assists the Chief Fire Warden with administration of Title 38, IDAHO CODE, Chapters 1 - Idaho Forestry Act, and Chapter 4 - Fire Hazard Reduction Law, as well as Rules Pertaining to Forest Fire Protection (IDAPA 20.04.01) and Fire Hazard Reduction (IDAPA 20.04.02) within the Zone by maintaining private fire assessment roles, conducts inspections, and preparing timely reports.
  • Performs assignments as a wildland firefighter within the scope of the incumbent’s training, incident command system certified qualifications, and physical abilities.
  • Routinely conducts wildland fire origin and cause investigations.


Key Requirements
·         SITPA is a Drug & Alcohol Free Workplace.  Adherence to SITPA’s policy on drugs and alcohol is a condition of employment.
·         A background investigation is required.
·         Must possess and maintain a valid driver’s license.  An acceptable driving record, including a determination of insurability by SITPA’s motor vehicle insurer is a condition of employment.
·         Prior experience as a wildland firefighter is required.
·         Work Capacity Testing (WCT) is required.  Based upon the type and level of work to be performed, successful completion the WCT at the ARDUOUS level is a condition of employment.
·         Prior supervisory experience is required.
·         Occasional overnight travel away from duty station is required.
·         Required to work long shifts or multi day assignments under stressful conditions during emergencies and fire season.
·         This position may be subject to satisfactory completion of a six month introductory period.

Qualifying Specialized Experience
Demonstrated specialized knowledge and skills obtained through work experience and training in the following areas is required.
1.       General knowledge of natural resource management practices, fire ecology, wildland fire behavior, and fire management theories, concepts, principles, and standards in a wildland fire environment.

2.       Technical knowledge of established principles, practices, and concepts (e.g. fire effects, fire hazard and risk analysis, fuel and flammability assessment, National Fire Danger Rating System, smoke management) sufficient to perform as a fire program manager and duty officer..

3.       Technical knowledge of, and experience with, the implementation of policies, techniques, and practices of wildland firefighting obtained through training and substantial wildland firefighting experience, with qualifications equivalent to or exceeding the NWCG National Incident Management System Wildland Fire Qualification System Guide (PMS 310-1) requirements for:

·         Minimum qualifying experience – Task Force Leader (TFLD)
·         Fully qualifying – Division Supervisor (DIVS)
And
·         Minimum qualifying experience – Incident Commander Type 4 (ICT4)
·         Fully qualifying – Incident Commander Type 3 (ICT3)

    If qualified as ICT4 and TFLD, must have extensive supervisory and fire experience.

4.       General knowledge of hazardous fuel treatment practices, prescribed fire techniques, and smoke management theories, concepts, principles, standards, and laws.

5.       Technical knowledge of, and experience with, the implementation of policies, techniques, and practices of prescribed burning obtained through training and substantial prescribe fire experience, with qualifications equivalent to or exceeding the NWCG National Incident Management System Wildland Fire Qualification System Guide (PMS 310-1) requirements for: 

·         Minimum qualifying experience – Firing Boss (FIRB), or
·         Fully qualifying - Prescribed Fire Burn Boss Type 2 (RXB2).

6.       Experience with supervisory policies, procedures, and methods.  Previous supervisory experience is required.

7.       General knowledge of workplace health and safety management, including hazard assessments, personal protective equipment, safety planning.  Technical knowledge of industry accepted wildland fire and prescribed fire safety practices and procedures.

8.       Skill in the use and interpretation of maps, aerial photographs, satellite imagery, and GIS products in the wildland fire management environment.

9.       Skill in oral and written communication sufficient to prepare reports, present training, and coordinate work efforts using computerized systems including word processing software, electronic spreadsheets, presentation software, and database management programs.

Physical Demands
A combination of field and office work is required.  Field work is sometimes performed in steep terrain where surfaces are uneven, rocky, or covered with thick vegetation.  Temperatures are frequently extreme, both from weather and fire conditions where the presence of smoke and dust/or dust conditions are frequently severe.

Benefits
This position is eligible for comprehensive range of employee benefits including:  paid sick leave, vacation pay, and holiday pay, medical benefits, life insurance, and retirement benefits through the Public Employees Retirement System of Idaho (www.persi.state.id.us/).

The application period has been extended to May 1, 2019.  Contact the Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association for more information:

                Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association
                Paul Wagner, Chief Fire Warden

                Phone:  (208)634-2268
                Email:  pwagner@sitpa.idaho.gov

                Attn:  Deputy Fire Warden Vacancy
                555 Deinhard Lane
                McCall, ID 83638

Hiring is done without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, or disability.

Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association, Inc. is a Drug & Alcohol Free Workplace.

More information can be found at:  sitpa.org

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

BLM transfers wildland fire engine to Clark County Fire Department


News Release
DATE: March 13, 2019

BLM transfers wildland fire engine to Clark County Fire Department
Twitter: @BLMIdahoFire Facebook: @IdahoFireInfo
#BLMIFDFire
IDAHO FALLS, Idaho— The Bureau of Land Management Idaho Falls District transferred a surplus wildland fire engine to the Clark County Fire Department today, part of BLM’s effort to respond to rural wildland fires by giving excess equipment and supplies to local fire departments and Rangeland Fire Protection Associations.

Under BLM’s new Rural Fire Readiness program, local fire departments and Rangeland Fire Protection Associations that meet certain requirements may receive at no cost wildland fire engines, pumps, hose, chainsaws, hand tools and other items the BLM no longer needs.

“We appreciate the assistance of our local fire departments and Rangeland Fire Protection Associations in wildland firefighting in eastern Idaho,” said Joel Gosswiller, BLM Fire Management Officer at Idaho Falls District. “The Rural Fire Readiness program allows us the opportunity to augment their response to wildland fires safely and effectively.”

The Clark County Fire Department has assisted on several wildland fires over the years, most notably with the Grassy Ridge Fire and the Indian Butte Fire, eastern Idaho’s two largest fires in 2018.

Last year, eastern Idaho had 141 fires that burned 133,957 acres. The BLM works closely with other federal and state agencies, local fire departments and Rangeland Fire Protection Associations to respond to wildland fires. 

###


Photo Attached: Transferred BLM wildland fire engine to Clark County Fire Department
Left to right: Mary D'Aversa (BLM Idaho Falls District Manager), Troy Stone (Clark County Fire Chief), Greg Shenton (Clark County Commissioner), Macoy Ward (Clark County Commissioner), Jill Egan (Clark County Emergency Management Director), Annette Eddins (Dubois Mayor), Kevin Conran (BLM Idaho Falls District Fire Mitigation & Education Specialist), Joel Gosswiller (BLM Idaho Falls District Fire Management Officer).

Monday, February 25, 2019

Northern Rockies Predictive Service Areas - Forecast


MARCH-APRIL-MAY-JUNE OUTLOOK                                                    Geographic Area:  Northern Rockies

Past Weather and Drought:
A cold but also fairly moist pattern took hold over the region during February, which helped to moderate incipient very dry conditions over portions of North Idaho, Southwest and Northwest Montana, and Eastern North Dakota. This cold pattern also has established and maintained solid snow cover east of the Continental Divide in the plains, with the bulk of that region now covered with a snowpack containing 1-3 inches of water equivalent. In terms of the past 90 days however, precipitation still has been somewhat below average over portions of North Idaho, Southwest Montana, and spotty areas in North Dakota. Mountain snowpacks in the western PSAs have registered substantial gains during February as well, and basin-average SWE’s are now near to slightly above-average region-wide. The latest US Drought Monitor shows that drought conditions have eased, with only areas of “Abnormally Dry” conditions persisting in North Idaho, Northwest Montana, and Northeast North Dakota.

Weather and Climate Outlook:
Weak El Niño conditions are still present according to the latest update from the NOAA Climate Prediction Center (CPC). Their long-term forecast calls for a moderation back to ENSO neutral conditions by summer. Seasonal temperature outlooks from the CPC depict above-average temperature likelihood for the entire outlook period through June in the Western PSAs, but near-average further east.  This could lead to a faster spring snowmelt in the Western PSAs. The CPC outlooks are depicting equal chances of below or above-average precipitation during the outlook period region-wide. Although the cold, moist pattern currently in place over the region will likely moderate by mid-March, mountain snowpack accumulations should persist. And so basin-average SWE’s by April 1st will likely end up being closer to long-term average values than what often occurs during weak El Niño winters.

Fuel Conditions:
Currently fuels are snow-covered across most of the Northern Rockies. When dry, warmer, windy periods return to the plains areas by mid-March, the melting snowpack moisture will help delay significant fire potential until the end of the month. With an outlook of near-average temperatures and precipitation for April in the plains, extended periods of very low fine dead fuel moistures caused by gusty chinook winds would be unlikely. If near-average temperatures and precipitation persist through the green-up months of May and June in the plains, live and dead fuel moistures would remain at near normal levels there. A slightly faster snowmelt in the western PSAs during April and May from the possibility of warmer than average temperatures would be offset by near-average precipitation, in terms of producing very low dead fuel moisture values.

Fire Season Timing/Discussion:
Typically during March and April in El Niño winters, the NRGA can see enhanced plains pre-greenup fire potential caused by more frequent and extended dry windy chinook flow periods. This is looking to be unlikely there until at least Mid-March, and the absence of drought conditions there combined with above-average precipitation for most of this region during the last 90 days will help limit significant fire potential until early April. Fire potential in the western PSAs typically is low in early spring except during dry windy periods in Southwest Montana, but these will likely not occur until at least the latter half of March, if not later. In May, through most of June, green-up conditions occur region-wide, and with the near-average precipitation outlooks then, live and dead fuel moistures should remain at near normal levels. Thus, “Normal” fire potential will be forecast for each month region-wide, March through June.

Monday, February 11, 2019

Boise District BLM is HIRING!



OUTREACH NOTICE – Senior FF, Engines GS-5


                         
Boise District BLM

Possible Duty Stations - Boise, Hammett, Bruneau, Star (Wild West)

Applications should be received by
03/12/2019 to be considered for referral for the first cut-off date.   

The Boise District BLM is getting ready to fill PERMANENT Senior Firefighter, Engine positions.

These positions are classified as “Forestry Technician (Fire), GS-0462A-05.”
Announcement # ID-DEU-2019-0008

These are permanent Long-Term Career Seasonal appointments; it is expected you will work at least 6 months, but less than 9 months a year.  When work or funds are not available, you will be placed in non-pay status.

Forestry Technician (Fire) (Senior Wildland Firefighter)
GS-0462A 05

How to Apply:

THIS IS AN ONLINE APPLICATION PROCESS.  If you need assistance in applying online please contact the Human Resources Office at (208) 373-3921 or email blm_id_hr_vacancies@blm.gov.  If applying online poses a hardship for you or you do not have access to the internet, you must contact HR prior to the closing date of the announcement for an alternative method of applying. 

All jobs listed within this notice may be found online at http://www.USAJOBs.gov/


Boise, Idaho

Boise is a full-service community.  The Boise metropolitan area’s economy is strong with many dual career opportunities, including a wide variety of federal agencies within easy driving distance, and many private sector job opportunities.  The cost of living is slightly below the national average, though real-estate has been steadily increasing in the last few years.  There are several institutions of higher learning in the area, including Boise State University.  Health care facilities and churches are widely available.  Entertainment opportunities abound in Boise and the metropolitan area, with a wide array of restaurants, dinner theaters, museums, and sports-and-music venues.  Additional information can be found on the Boise Chamber of Commerce website:

Mountain Home, Idaho

Mountain Home, ID is approximately 45 miles east of Boise along Interstate 84.  Mountain Home is a full-service community supporting outlying areas and the Mountain Home Air Force Base.  Summer and fall months are typically warm and dry, with daily highs averaging between 85 to 95 degrees, and nightly lows from 40 to 55 degrees.  The climate in the winter is typical of the high desert, with low temperatures averaging between 20 and 30 degrees with occasional sub-zero overnight readings. 

ADDITIONAL Websites to visit the Boise area:


Thursday, February 7, 2019

Boise District BLM is HIRING!







OUTREACH NOTICE - Engine Captain GS-6/7


                         
Boise District BLM

Possible Duty Stations - Boise, Hammett, Bruneau, Star (Wild West)

Applications should be received by
02/21/2019 to be considered for referral.   

The Boise District BLM is getting ready to fill multiple PERMANENT Engine Captain positions.

These positions are classified as “Forestry Technician (fire), GS-0462A-6/7.”
Announcement # ID-MERIT-2019-0034

These are permanent Long-Term Career Seasonal appointments; it is expected you will work at least 6 months, but less than 9 months a year.  When work or funds are not available, you will be placed in non-pay status.

Forestry Technician (Fire) (Engine Captain)
GS-0462A 06/07
ID-Merit-2019-0034  
(Federal Employees or Special Hiring Authorities)

https://www.usajobs.gov/Search/?k=ID-Merit-2019-0034&p=1

How to Apply:

THIS IS AN ONLINE APPLICATION PROCESS.  If you need assistance in applying online please contact the Human Resources Office at (208) 373-3921 or email blm_id_hr_vacancies@blm.gov.  If applying online poses a hardship for you or you do not have access to the internet, you must contact HR prior to the closing date of the announcement for an alternative method of applying. 

All jobs listed within this notice may be found online at http://www.USAJOBs.gov/


Boise, Idaho

Boise is a full-service community.  The Boise metropolitan area’s economy is strong with many dual career opportunities, including a wide variety of federal agencies within easy driving distance, and many private sector job opportunities.  The cost of living is slightly below the national average, though real-estate has been steadily increasing in the last few years.  There are several institutions of higher learning in the area, including Boise State University.  Health care facilities and churches are widely available.  Entertainment opportunities abound in Boise and the metropolitan area, with a wide array of restaurants, dinner theaters, museums, and sports-and-music venues.  Additional information can be found on the Boise Chamber of Commerce website:

Mountain Home, Idaho

Mountain Home, ID is approximately 45 miles east of Boise along Interstate 84.  Mountain Home is a full-service community supporting outlying areas and the Mountain Home Air Force Base.  Summer and fall months are typically warm and dry, with daily highs averaging between 85 to 95 degrees, and nightly lows from 40 to 55 degrees.  The climate in the winter is typical of the high desert, with low temperatures averaging between 20 and 30 degrees with occasional sub-zero overnight readings. 

ADDITIONAL Websites to visit the Boise area:


Wednesday, January 30, 2019

BLM conducting aerial seeding on 2017, 2018 burn scars


BLM to conduct aerial seeding on 2017, 2018 burn scars

IDAHO FALLS, Idaho – For two weeks beginning in mid-January, the Bureau of Land Management Upper Snake Field Office will conduct aerial seeding operations across wildland fire burn scars from the 2017 and 2018 fire seasons. The BLM will broadcast seed approximately 52,000 acres of BLM-administered lands, utilizing both fixed and rotor-wing aircraft.

“When the smoke clears there is still work to do,” said Jeremy Casterson, BLM Upper Snake Field Office Manager. “Rehabilitating the land after a wildfire helps restore habitat and ward off invasive plants.”

The aerial operations will rehabilitate the 2018 Grassy Ridge fire near Dubois, the 2017 and 2018 fires near Menan Butte, and the 2017 Wildhorse and Lava Flow fires near Atomic City. Broadcast seeding will help restore ground cover, support water infiltration, prevent cheatgrass dominance and stabilize soils. The seed mix will be comprised of sagebrush and bunch grasses.





Idaho Falls District BLM teaches Basic Fire School to the Camas Creek RFPA


Idaho Falls District BLM teaches Basic Fire School to the Camas Creek Rangeland Fire Protection Association.
Camas Creek RFPA responded to Grassy Ridge Fire (99,173 acres), Indian Butte Fire (12,572) and many others during the 2018 fire season. They help protect 1.5 million acres.
All attendees learned basic fire suppression techniques and communication skills. They learned how to apply what they already know about local weather patterns to fire behavior. Instructors shared their experiences in fireline leadership, command, and safety.
Creation of the associations is a collaborative effort between local ranchers, the federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL).
Idaho ranchers provide swift initial attack to rangeland fires because of their knowledge of the land and proximity to the fires. #BLMIFDFire


Monday, January 28, 2019

Prescribed Burning South of Burley, ID.


The Idaho Department of Lands will be conducting a pile burning project approximately 40 miles south of Burley, ID in the Jim Sage Mountains.  Burning will begin on Wednesday, January 30th and continue through Friday, February 1st.  The project will burn roughly 1700 piles of juniper that were cleared as part of a Cohesive Strategy Special Project that was grant funded  by the US Forest Service through the Idaho Department of Lands.  The project is located in two different units; one unit is approximately 4 miles east of Elba, ID, and the other is approximately 4 miles south-southwest of Almo, ID


The intention of the fuels treatment is to reduce juniper density to improve sage grouse habitat and create fuel breaks to protect existing sage habitat. 

Friday, December 14, 2018

Idaho Falls District BLM and Uwharrie National Forest Partnership


Idaho Falls District BLM developed a unique partnership with the Uwharrie National Forest in North Carolina after the severe fires in fall 2016. Since then #BLMIFDFire has been returning to the Uwharrie NF to assist with fire suppression and prescribed fires. Check out the article to learn more: http://www.southernwildfire.net/success-stories/mutually-beneficial-partnership-provides-wildfire-and-prescribed-assistance-and-firefighter-training/